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About TNUA

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Introduction

In 1979, the Executive Yuan, unveiling a plan to promote cultural and recreational activities, decided to set up a higher education institution dedicated to nurturing talents for fine arts, performing arts and academic research. So the school had to be founded on the "highest standards". The government at the time invested multiple resources and assembled a team of elite in order to provide new momentum for the development of the nation's arts and related human resources. On October 22, 1980 a preparatory committee was formed by leading figures from the arts and educational sectors, and on July 1, 1982 the National Institute of the Arts was born.
 
The school was founded with three departments: Music, Fine Arts and Theatre Arts. Classes were taught in rooms borrowed from the Taipei International Youth Center. In 1983, the school added the Department of Dance. In April 1985, classes were moved to facilities borrowed from the National Overseas Chinese Student University Preparatory School at Luchou, Taipei County. In September 1990, construction work on the Kuandu campus was completed. In late July 1991, the school was formally relocated to Kuandu. The school's entire staff and students took part in a ritualistic parade to the new campus, marking a brand new stage of the school's development.        
 
In order to provide a platform for integrating various academic achievements, the Center for Traditional Arts was established in 1982. In 1992, the Center for Art and Technology was set up to become a champion of cross-disciplinary integration between art and technology. In 1993, the school founded the Performance Arts Center, becoming the only higher education institute in Taiwan to own a professional concert hall, dance theatre and experimental theatre. It was renamed as the Performing Art Center in 1994.
 
On August 1, 2001 the school was officially renamed as Taipei National University of the Arts (TNUA) with five schools: Music, Fine Arts, Theatre Arts, Dance, and Culture Resources.
 
In addition, in order to enhance its academic performance and expand its international presence, TNUA turned its research and development center into the Office of Research and Development and created the International Exchange Center on August 1, 2006. And to promote arts education into the community, the Center for Continuing Education and the Creative Resource Center for Traditional Arts were merged to form the Center for Arts Resources and Continuing Educational Outreach in 2008. In the same year, the Arts and Activity Complex was unveiled, with its movie theatre formally opened in October.
 
To further shape TNUA into a comprehensive arts university, the School of Film and New Media was founded in 2009. In 2010, the Department of Filmmaking and the Department of New Media Art were introduced.
 
Now TNUA has six schools covering major areas in arts and culture: Music, Fine Arts, Theatre Arts, Dance, Film and New Media, and Culture Resources. Its comprehensiveness and range of facilitiesincluding a Concert Hall, Dance Theatre 
Experimental Theatre, Movie Theatre and Kuandu Museum of Fine Arts
are rare among the world’s universities. It is an ideal training ground for arts talents through a pedagogy that places equal emphases on the academic and practical sides.
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