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Thai choreographer Klunchun and HORSE founder Chen give talk

What’s New
Poster:Secretariat OfficePost date:2018-04-20
No. of visits:7
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The School of Dance arranged a talk by Thai choreographer Pichet Klunchun and HORSE founder Wu-kang Chen on April 18.
 
Mr. Chen, from Taiwan, started learning ballet at the age of 11 and later also received dance training overseas. Later he started to question the legitimacy of a Taiwanese doing ballet dancing and then the concept of “home” in terms of culture – until he met Mr. Klunchun. 
 
Klunchu was once a student of a traditional Thai dance master, and in order to have a different learning environment that would allow him to feel a substantial link between he self and the body, he later enrolled in a dancing school. After three years, he could see the big differences. He started to think about his future and realize the problems with traditional Thai dance.
 
He went on to study theatre, learning Western texts and receiving training different from that for traditional dancers. He later went to live in New York. When he returned to Thailand, Mr. Klunchun created a piece Khon dance without the traditional mask. He added modern elements into the dance, revolutionizing the look of the traditional Thai dance, but enraging the Thai audiences.
 
Mr. Klunchun said he knew his own intentions clearly when creating the work, and he was not trying to be following the trends. 
 
As for tradition, Mr. Chen noted that Taiwan’s artists seem to place heavy emphasis on “originality” or a sense of “purity” when it comes to creativity. But he pointed out that the coming of Western culture to Taiwan sometimes makes it difficult to tell what “authenticity” is. 
 
He said that having learned ballet at a young age and taichi, he sees his own body as the “tradition” where national boundaries and skin colors do not matter.    
 
Mr. Klunchun pointed out different cultures see tradition in different ways. The West has arrived at the present moment after going through the traditional, the modern and the postmodern. Southeast Asia, in contrast, entered the present moment abruptly from the traditional without going through the modern and postmodern.
 
Caption: Thai choreographer Pichet Klunchun (standing, center) and HORSE founder Wu-kang Chen (standing, second right) at TNUA. 
 
Last modification time:2018-05-08 PM 4:30

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